To Pool, or Not To Pool

Swimming pools are a thing of luxury, a thing to show off to the neighbors and make you a more valid solution to host the summer party but are they a sound investment for your home?

So the questions becomes, to pool or not to pool?

To Pool!

Judge Thy Neighbor – Even if you have the finances to have a pool installed you should still consider what is around your home. If you live in a more expensive or upscale neighborhood where pools are common then it’s probably a great decision. In fact, if you live in a neighborhood where pools are more common than not then you probably should seriously considering adding a pool as not having one will be unattractive to prospective buyers.

Will it Fit? – Can your yard actually handle a decent-sized in ground pool or will it eat up all your space? Installing a tiny pool for the sake of just having a pool is rarely a good move, especially in a residential setting where the pool will likely be a source of entertainment. If you have a large yard and installing a nicely-sized pool will still leave you with a beautiful lawn and room for landscaping then it will add value.

Resell Value – If you plan on selling the home soon or before 10 years or so then you’ll probably be able to recoup more costs from having it installed. Chances are a pool is a better bet for homeowners that know they will want to sell in 5 or 10 years, but will have a few years of personal enjoyment prior.

This is only the surface of answering the illustrious question, but important ones to factor.

Not To Pool!

Here are the factors to consider when you are leaning to a garden instead of a pool.

More Dry Time than Wet – If your pool is going to have more downtime than usable time it’s probably going to feel like waste of money. Unless you have the funds to have an indoor pool you should probably avoid a pool if you’ll only be able to use it a few months out of the year.

When Are You Moving? – Homeowners planning on selling in under 5 years probably will end up feeling like they barely got any money back from the pool as they didn’t even get to enjoy it for themselves. On the other hand, if you are a homeowner that loves your home and knows you probably won’t sell for 15 or 20 years then the future costs of resurfacing means you won’t be getting much of an investment from a pool.

Your Home is a Family Home – If your home is going to be an attractive choice for families with young children then a pool can actually be a hindrance due to safety risks. If your neighborhood is one with a lot of new families or your yard has a playground that is aimed at kids under 10 or 12, think about how pools could be more of a headache than a bonus for prospective buyers.

A Pool Will Significantly Affect Your Finances – Upkeep aside, if building a pool is going to leave you penniless it really isn’t a good move and shouldn’t be put off until the future. By waiting and saving up funds or considering a loan you could not only get a pool for also have the budget to landscape, build a deck, install a grassy area and more to make the backyard appealing on multiple levels.

 

At the end of the day you need to take into consideration if a pool will generate more happiness or more headaches. This is your ultimate litmus test to whether the neighborhood kids will be spending the summer at your house